Online dating background images

Posted by / 03-Aug-2017 20:58

Online dating background images

Yet, when it comes to online matters of the heart, finding “the one” often remains elusive.

That’s because love, like the Internet, has a lingo and etiquette all its own.

While many of said online matchmaking entities equate “attraction” with a mathematical equation, Nerve Dating (an off-shoot of the sex/dating/culture site, Nerve.com), has incorporated social media conventions into their platform that allow soulmate searchers to create connections via interactive conversations, rather than simply writing essays, checking off endless lists, and hoping for the best.

We’ve tapped Nerve.com’s dating columnist Caitlin Robinson, AKA Miss Information, to offer some tips and tricks to those of you prepping to post your profile.

(Photo: Getty Images)When you’re young and not yet experienced with dating, your view of the whole process is likely pretty straightforward. Vanity Fair, aptly titled, “Tinder and the Dawn of the ‘Dating Apocalypse.’” Aziz Ansari’s new book, Modern Romance, details the pains of sifting through piles of electronic choices, only to ultimately come up empty-handed — and disheartened." data-reactid="22"Walk through any bar or restaurant on a Saturday night, and you’re more likely to see singles swiping their phone screens instead of talking to real-life potential matches.  " data-reactid="30"I’m not saying it can’t work.

You meet a nice person, who you ask on a date (or maybe he/she asks you on the date). You make things “official.” Before you know it, you’re both on the road to happily-ever-after. You part ways — and maybe you ghost each other." data-reactid="20"But then you grow up, and the actual dating scene looks a little more like this: You swipe right, and so does he. Nancy Jo Sales announced the fall of classic courtship in her September piece for Vanity Fair, aptly titled, “Tinder and the Dawn of the ‘Dating Apocalypse.’” Aziz Ansari’s new book, Modern Romance, details the pains of sifting through piles of electronic choices, only to ultimately come up empty-handed — and disheartened. After all, everyone knows that couple who met on an app or dating site and is now happily hitched.

Instead of saying, ‘I’m witty,’” Robinson suggests, “say, ‘I’m one part Ricky Gervais, one part Jon Stewart, and a soupcon of Fred Flintstone.’ That paints a more vivid picture.” I like surfing, reading, swimming, jogging, and cooking. If you saw a list like this on a cute girl’s profile, how would you possibly respond? “ ‘Last summer, I went surfing at the Jersey Shore nearly every day with my dog Rufus. Buy me a beer, and I’ll tell you more.’ Something like that gives a date plenty to want to talk to you about—plus you sound like an active, interesting person, not just a list of gerunds.” Don’t stretch the truth, even on minor details.

I look for that inexplicable “click.” I’m not the hook-up type. Before making my decision, I need to understand how to do it the right way — without it being a total waste of my time and energy (or a source of stress).

What are the pitfalls — and why might it be better than IRL dating? If you prize options above all else, online and app dating delivers that in spades.

What are the pitfalls — and why might it be better than IRL dating?  " data-reactid="31"I get it — online dating is the new “normal” in today’s day and age.

But I’m also a person who values her time and emotional investment (like most people).

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If the Internet is good for anything—and, actually, it’s good for lots of things—it’s good for finding a needle in a haystack.